Arizona Archaeological Society

 

 
 

2020-2021 Meeting Schedule 

The chapter usually meets at Pueblo Grande Museum at 7:00 pm on the second Tuesday of each month (except during June, July & August). However, due to the pandemic, we are now holding Zoom meetings on the same schedule and hope to resume in-person meetings in September.

Driving directions: Traffic approaching from the east must make a U-turn at the light at 44th street; from the west, use 44th Street or east-bound Washington Street.

Date     
Speaker
Topic

Dec. 8  

Patrick Lyons, Ph.D., Director, Arizona State Museum

The Davis Ranch Site: A Kayenta Immigrant Enclave in Southeastern Arizona

Jan. 12

Pat Gilman, Ph.D.

Ancient Macaws in Mimbres, Chaco and the Hohokam

Feb. 9


Ron Parker


Ancient Agaves of Arizona

March 9


Todd Bostwick, Ph.D.


Megalithic Tombs and Temples of Ireland

April 13


Don Liponi


La Rumorosa: Rock Art Along the Border, Volume 2.

May 11


TBA



To join the Phoenix Chapter, Click on here:

Phoenix Chapter Membership Form

MARCH CHAPTER NEWS

March Meeting: Our next Zoom meeting, on Tuesday, March 9th at 7:30 pm, will feature Todd Bostwick, Megalithic Tombs and Temples of Ireland: Sacred Architecture and Art on the Emerald Isle, circa 4000-2000BC by Todd W. Bostwick, PhD. About 6,000 years ago, the Neolithic inhabitants of Ireland began successfully farming wheat and barley while also raising cattle and sheep. They also built large stone structures, some truly megalithic in size, that apparently served various social and ritual purposes. Some of the megalithic structures are covered, both inside and out, with elaborate geometric petroglyphs as shown in the photo below. The petroglyphs  have been interpreted as astronomical markers related to lunar cycles, trance imagery, or other meanings. Some structures are part of large-scale site complexes, such as New Grange, and are scattered across sacred landscapes. In this talk Dr. Bostwick will summarize the development of megalithic structures in Ireland, including passage tombs, court tombs, portal tombs, wedge tombs, and stone circles. Although originally identified as tombs, many of the megalithic structures are now thought to be better understood as temples where only a few individuals were buried.

Dr. Bostwick has been a professional archaeologist for more than 40 years. He has an MA in Anthropology and a PhD in History from Arizona State University (ASU). He was the Phoenix City Archaeologist for 21 years at Pueblo Grande Museum and the Director of Archaeology at the Verde Valley Archaeology Center in Camp Verde for 9 years. He also taught classes for seven years at both ASU and Northern Arizona University. Dr. Bostwick has published numerous books and articles on archaeology and history and has received awards from the National Park Service, the Arizona Governor’s Office, the State Historic Preservation Office, the  Arizona Archaeological Society, and the City of Phoenix.

I will send out a Zoom Invitation to all Phoenix chapter members the week before the meeting. The waiting room will open at 7 pm for those who want to enter early. There will be time for Q&A after the talk.

February Meeting: The speaker for our Feb. 9th Zoom meeting was Ron Parker, an outdoorsman, xeric plant enthusiast, and amateur botanist who has been studying agave populations in Arizona for many years. He presented Ancient Agaves of Arizona in which he explained how archaeologists discovered that the curious rockpiles which covered many shallow slopes near Hohokam sites had been used to grow agaves for both fiber and food. Some very special types of agave continued to grow in these areas long after they were abandoned. These agaves appear to be anthropogenic cultivars - living archaeological relics developed and planted by indigenous Native Americans - and many appear to be growing exactly where they were planted hundreds of years ago. Ron maintains a well-known xeric plant discussion forum, Agaveville.org, an online repository for information on agaves and other succulent plants. For more information, his book, Chasing Centuries: The Search for Ancient Agave Cultivars Across the Desert Southwest, published in 2018, is available for purchase from Sunbelt Publications, Inc. (htttps/sunbeltpublications.com/authors/ron-parker/).

Upcoming Meetings:

Apr 13    Don Liponi, La Rumorosa: Rock Art Along the Border, Volume 2

May 11: TBD

Hikes and Field Trips: Our coordinators are working on finding hikes and field trips that can be attended safely given Covid-19 safety protocols. Details will be forthcoming. If you have any suggestions, please contact Phyllis at 76desert@gmail.com or Eric at feldbrain@hotmail.com.

--Ellie Large

Click here to download March flyer


**For chapter news from earlier this year, go to the bottom of this page.

Phoenix Chapter Officers

Office Office Holder Telephone Email
President Ellie Large 480-461-0563 elarge@cox.net
Exec VP/Field Trips Eric Feldman 480-296-5217 feldbrain@gmail.com
Treasurer, Acting Gail Williams 480-855-7735 glwilliamsaz@yahoo.com
Secretary/Education Ellen Martin 480-820-1474 e13martin@hotmail.com
1-Year Dir/Membership Vicki Caltabiano 480-730-3289 vickierhart@cox.net
2-Year Dir/Field Trips Phyllis Smith 623-694-8245 76desert@gmail.com
3-Year Dir/Newsletter Nancy Unferth 602-371-1165
nferth@aol.com
Archivist/Cert Rep Marie Britton 480-827-8070 mbrit@cox.net
Advisor Laurene Montero 602-495-0901 laurene.montero@phoenix.gov 



PGM STABILIZATION - PHOENIX CHAPTER

Pueblo Grande is a Classic Period Hohokam site located in downtown Phoenix at Pueblo Grande Museum and Archaeological Park. This archaeological site has been designated a National Historic Landmark. For the past thirteen years the Arizona Archaeology Society, Phoenix Chapter volunteers along with the Southwest Archaeology Team have participated in doing stabilization, reconstruction, and general maintenance on the platform mound and adjacent room structures.

After the Hohokam abandoned this site, it fell into a state of self-stabilization where walls become protected by the material that eroded from above. Early excavations, especially in the 1930's, exposed many of these walls again. These adobe walls have been subjected to constant erosion from wind and rain as well as other agents of deterioration. Consequently, new adobe mud must be applied periodically to keep these structures from melting away. Stone faced walls require repointing to keep the stones from falling from the wall. Exposed room walls are protected by applying a thin layer of mud to the wall surface. Monitoring these architectural features for erosion damage is an on-going task.

A dedicated group of volunteers, known as the PGM Mudslingers meet one Saturday a month except in July and August. The Mudslingers work is coordinated by Laurene Montero (Phoenix City Archaeologist). All work is documented by detailed field notes and photos.

This partnership between the Mudslingers and the City Archaeologist is a great benefit to Pueblo Grande Museum and is very much appreciated by the Museum Director and the Parks and Recreation Department staff.



LOCAL MUSEUMS

Museum

Location

Website

Pueblo Grande Museum and Archaeological Park

4619 E. Washington Street, Phoenix AZ 85034

(602) 495-0901

Pueblo Grande Museum

Huhugam Heritage Center

 21359 S Maricopa Rd, Chandler, AZ 85226

grichhc.org

Huhugam Ki Museum

10005 E. Osborn Road, Scottsdale, Arizona 85256

(480) 850-8190

Huhugam Ki Museum

Arizona Museum of Natural History

53 N. Macdonald St., Mesa, AZ 85201

(480) 664-2230

Arizona Museum of Natural History

Cave Creek Museum

6140 East Skyline Drive, Cave Creek, AZ 85331

(480) 488-2764

Cave Creek Museum

San Tan Historical Society Museum 

20425 S Old Ellsworth Rd., Queen Creek, Az

(480) 987-9380

 San Tan Historical Society Museum

Scottsdale's Museum of the West

3830 N. Marshall Way, Scottsdale, AZ 85251

(480) 686-9539

 Scottsdale's Museum of the West


FEBRUARY CHAPTER NEWS

February Meeting: Our next Zoom meeting, on Tuesday, Feb. 9th at 7:30 pm, will feature Ron Parker, author of Chasing Centuries: The Search for Ancient Agave Cultivars Across the Desert Southwest, who will present Ancient Agaves of Arizona. His talk will cover the duration of human and agave coevolution across the desert southwest, and the unusual agaves apparently associated with archaeological sites that were abandoned long ago. These agaves appear to be anthropogenic cultivars - living archaeological relics developed and planted by indigenous Native Americans - and many appear to be growing exactly where they were planted hundreds of years ago.

Ron Parker is an outdoorsman, xeric plant enthusiast, and amateur botanist who spends half his time gardening, and the other half exploring natural habitats across Arizona and neighboring states. He has been studying agave populations in Arizona for many years, and has been out in the field with renowned botanists and regional archaeologists. When not under the open sky, he maintains a well-known xeric plant discussion forum, Agaveville.org, an impressive online repository for information on agaves and other succulent plants. His book, Chasing Centuries: The Search for Ancient Agave Cultivars Across the Desert Southwest, published in 2018, is available for purchase from Sunbelt Publications, Inc. (htttps/sunbeltpublications.com/authors/ron-parker/)

January Meeting: Our Jan. 12th Zoom meeting featured Pat Gilman, Ph. D., who presented Ancient Macaws in Mimbres, Chaco and the Hohokam. She introduced us to several large and colorful birds – parrots, military macaws and scarlet macaws. Thick-billed parrots were once native to Arizona but the macaws are natives of Mexico and scarlet macaws are native to tropical regions of Mexico and Central America. The scarlet macaw was the most spectacular item in the ancient southwest that was obtained from Mexico. They were present and contemporary at Mimbres Classic and Chacoan sites from about A.D. 1000 to 1130 and even earlier in the Hohokam region. Dr. Gilman argues that people there was little commonality between Mimbres and Chaco in terms of how scarlet macaws were used and probably therefore their role within the social and religious systems. Despite this, the Mimbres and Chaco macaws belong to the same rare genetic group, suggesting they had the same breeding source. These patterns show the complexity of studying exotic items within their varying social contexts.

Upcoming Meetings:

Mar 9      Todd Bostwick, Megalithic Tombs and Temples of Ireland

Apr 13    Don Liponi, La Rumorosa: Rock Art Along the Border, Volume 2

Hikes and Field Trips: Our coordinators are working on finding hikes and field trips that can be attended safely given Covid-19 safety protocols. Details will be forthcoming. If you have any suggestions, please contact Phyllis at 76desert@gmail.com or Eric at feldbrain@hotmail.com.

--Ellie Large

JANUARY CHAPTER NEWS

December Meeting: The speaker for our first Zoom meeting on Dec. 8th was Patrick Lyons, Ph.D., Director, Arizona State Museum, who gave us an excellent presentation on the archaeology behind the book The Davis Ranch Site: A Kayenta Immigrant Enclave in Southeastern Arizona” recently published by the Amerind Foundation. The book reports the results of Rex Gerald’s 1957 excavations for the Amerind Foundation at the Davis Ranch Site in southeastern Arizona’s San Pedro River Valley. Lyons summarized Gerald’s findings and placed his work in the context of what is now known regarding the late thirteenth-century Kayenta diaspora and also the relationship between Kayenta immigrants and the Salado phenomenon.

Gerald and others identified the site as having been inhabited by people from the Kayenta area of northeastern Arizona and southeastern Utah. The results of Gerald’s excavations, coupled with information from Archaeology Southwest’s San Pedro Preservation Project (1990-2001), indicate that the people of the Davis Ranch Site were part of a network of dispersed immigrant enclaves responsible for the origin and the spread of Roosevelt Red Ware pottery, also known as Salado Red Ware and Salado Polychrome. Evidence from the Davis Ranch Site also lends support to Patricia Crown’s Roosevelt Red Ware stylistic seriation and more recently proposed changes to Roosevelt Red Ware typology and chronology.

January Meeting: Our next Zoom meeting, on Tuesday, Jan. 12, at 7:30 pm*, will feature Pat Gilman, Ph. D., who will present Ancient Macaws in Mimbres, Chaco and the Hohokam. Scarlet macaws were the most spectacular item in the ancient southwestern United States obtained from farther south in Mexico. They were present and contemporary at Mimbres Classic and Chacoan sites from about A.D. 1000 to 1130. They were present even earlier in the Hohokam region. Does the presence of macaws in these three regions indicate a similar use and meaning? Does it suggest social relationships between people in the various regions? Dr. Gilman argues that people used macaws and parrots differently in the three regions. For example, about 30 scarlet macaws were concentrated at Pueblo Bonito, although one or two were present in each of three other Chaco Canyon sites. In contrast, perhaps as many as 15 scarlet macaws were spread among at least 8 Mimbres Classic sites, some of them within the Mimbres Valley core and some not. Mimbres macaws were buried with a person or buried by themselves beneath a room floor, in Great Kiva fill, or in a midden, while most of the Chaco macaws were on floors or in room fill. These differences support the idea that there was little commonality between Mimbres and Chaco in terms of how scarlet macaws were used and probably therefore their role within the social and religious systems. However, the Mimbres and Chaco macaws all belong to the same rare genetic group, suggesting they had the same breeding source. These patterns show the complexity of studying exotic items within their varying social contexts.

Pat received her Ph. D.in Anthropology from the University of New Mexico in 1983 and is now Professor Emerita from the Dept. of Anthropology at the University of Oklahoma. She has done archaeological fieldwork and research in the Mimbres region of southwestern New Mexico and southeastern Arizona for more than 40 years. Her initial interests were architecture and the transition that ancient people made from living in pit-houses to inhabiting pueblos. Recently Dr. Gilman and her colleagues have been investigating the presence of scarlet macaws in Mimbres sites, their dates and DNA, and how they might have been brought to the southwestern United States from the tropical forest of southern Mexico.

*I will send out the Zoom meeting invitation to our chapter members several days before the meeting. (If others want to be attend the talk, please email me at elarge@cox.com.) The waiting room for the Zoom meeting will open at 7 pm for those who want to enter early and say hi to friends before the meeting starts. There will be time for Q&A after the talk.

Upcoming Meetings:

Feb. 9     Ron Parker, Ancient Agaves of Arizona

Mar 9      Todd Bostwick, Megalithic Tombs and Temples of Ireland

Apr 13    Don Liponi, La Rumorosa: Rock Art Along the Border, Volume 2

2019-2020 Speaker Schedule

Date   
Speaker
Topic
Nov. 12
John Langan, Aztec Eng., Phoenix Recent Excavations in the Eastern Papaguería
Dec. 10
Todd Bostwick, VVAC, Verde Valley Ankgor and the Khmer Empire of Cambodia
Jan. 14
Janine Hernbrode, ASW, Tucson
Patterns in Petroglyphs: Hints of the Hohokam Cosmology on the Landscape
Feb. 11
Gregory McNamee, Az Humanities The Gila: River of History
Mar  10
Allen Dart, Az Humanities The Antiquity of Irrigation in the Southwest
Apr  14
Ron Parker - Cancelled due to Pandemic

Chasing Centuries: The Search for Ancient Agave Cultivars Across the Desert Southwest

Canceled due to pandemic; to be rescheduled

May 12
Don Liponi - Cancelled due to Pandemic
La Rumorosa: Rock Art Along the Border, Vol. 2; To be rescheduled

Phoenix December 2020 Chapter News

Last Meeting before the Lockdown: At our March 10th meeting Allen Dart gave a very well-organized and interesting talk on The   Antiquity of Irrigation in the Southwest, tracing the development of irrigation systems in Arizona to at least 3,500 years ago. He   gave us an overview of ancient irrigation systems in the southern Southwest and discussed irrigation’s implications for social complexity. The presentation was made possible by the AZ Speaks program, the longest-running and most popular program of the Arizona  Humanities, a statewide 501(c)3 non-profit organization and the Arizona affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

We were also holding a book sale and a raffle. Both were to continue at the next meeting. We had several tables of books for sale and stored the remainder at PGM to sell at our next meeting. We were also selling raffle tickets for an Acoma pot. These activities will be continued whenever we have another in-person meeting. We had to cancel our April and May meetings and hope to reschedule the speakers as soon as possible either for a Zoom Meeting or when in-person meetings are allowed to resume, perhaps in September.

December Meeting: In the meantime we will be holding Zoom meetings beginning with our Dec. 8th meeting which will feature a talk on The Davis Ranch Site: A Kayenta Immigrant Enclave in Southeastern Arizona by Patrick Lyons, Ph.D., Director, Arizona State Museum. Dr. Lyons will discuss the recently published book that reports the results of Rex Gerald’s 1957 excavations, sponsored by the Amerind Foundation, at the Davis Ranch Site in southeastern Arizona’s San Pedro River Valley. He will summarize Gerald’s findings as well as the results of recent studies, placing Gerald’s work in the context of what is now known regarding the late thirteenth-century Kayenta diaspora and also the relationship between Kayenta immigrants and the Salado phenomenon.

Data presented by Gerald and others identify the site as having been inhabited by people from the Kayenta area of northeastern Arizona and southeastern Utah. The results of Gerald’s excavations, coupled with information from Archaeology Southwest’s San Pedro Preservation Project (1990-2001), indicate that the people of the Davis Ranch Site were part of a network of dispersed immigrant enclaves responsible for the origin and the spread of Roosevelt Red Ware pottery, the key material marker of the Salado phenomenon. Evidence from the Davis Ranch Site also lends support to Patricia Crown’s Roosevelt Red Ware stylistic seriation and more recently proposed changes to Roosevelt Red Ware typology and chronology.

Dr. Lyons is the director of the Arizona State and an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of Arizona. After receiving his B.A. and M.A. degrees in Anthropology from the University of Illinois-Chicago, he earned his Ph.D. in Anthropology at the University of Arizona. His dissertation research, conducted while a staff member of the Arizona State Museum’s Homol’ovi Research Program, focused on the origins of the people of the Homol’ovi site cluster and the relationship between Kayenta immigrants and the development and spread of the Salado phenomenon. Before joining the faculty of the University of Arizona, he spent six years as a Preservation Archaeologist at Archaeology Southwest. His research interests include the late prehispanic and protohistoric archaeology of the American Southwest and northwestern Mexico; Hopi ethnography, history, and ethnohistory; ceramic decorative and technological style; ceramic compositional analysis; migration, diaspora, and identity; and the use of tribal oral tradition in archaeological research.

Field Trips:  Our field trip coordinator is working on finding field trips that can be attended safely given Covid-19 safety protocols. Details will be forthcoming.

--Ellie Large

MARCH 2020 CHAPTER NEWS


March 10th Meeting: Allen Dart will present The Antiquity of Irrigation in the Southwest. Before AD 1500, Native American cultures took advantage of southern Arizona’s long growing season and tackled its challenge of limited precipitation by developing the earliest and most extensive irrigation works in all of North America. Agriculture was introduced to Arizona more than 4,000 years before present, and irrigation systems were developed in our state at least 3,500 years ago. This presentation provides an overview of ancient irrigation systems in the southern Southwest and discusses irrigation’s implications for understanding social complexity. This presentation  is made possible by the AZ Speaks program, the longest-running and most popular program of Arizona Humanities, a statewide 501(c)3 non-profit organization and the Arizona affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Allen Dart is a Registered Professional Archaeologist, has worked in Arizona and New Mexico since 1975, and has been an Arizona Humanities speaker since 1997. He is the former executive director of Tucson’s nonprofit Old Pueblo Archaeology Center, which he founded in 1993 to provide educational and scientific programs in archaeology, history, and cultures. He has received the Arizona Governor’s Archaeology Advisory Commission Award in Public Archaeology, the Arizona Archaeological Society’s Professional Archaeologist of the Year Award, and the Arizona Archaeological and Historical Society’s Victor R. Stoner Award for his efforts to bring archaeology and history to the public.

Book Sale: Please collect any books, posters, maps, etc., that you want to donate and bring them with you - along with cash or checks to buy more books! We will set up the room in the afternoon and we should be able to get into it soon after 6:30 pm.. We have already received a generous donation of about 40 archaeology books and pamphlets from Don Schuldes in memory of his wife, Marilyn Schuldes, who was a long-time member of the Phoenix Chapter. We will donate the proceeds to PGM.

Raffle:  We will also be selling raffle tickets for the Acoma pot - you can buy tickets for the raffle before and after the evening's presentation. The winning ticket will be drawn at the April 14th meeting.

Reminder: only AAS members can go on field trips! Renew today if you haven't already. Download the Phoenix Chapter membership page from https://azarchsoc.wildapricot.org/Phoenix and mail the form and your check to the address shown, or you can renew and pay online using AffiniPay or a debit or credit card on the AAS website. Logon to www.AzArchSoc.org,click on Membership under About Us, and follow the instructions.

Upcoming Events:

March 9:     2020 Sonoran Symposium at the Sonoran Desert Inn and Conference Center in Ajo. Go to

                 https://www.sonoransymposium.com for more information.

March 10:   Book Sale, both fiction and non-fiction, archaeology-related preferred.

March 14:   1:30 pm. AAS/SWAT Study Group at Tempe History Museum. Call Ellen Martin at 480-820-1474

                 for more information or if you would like to be added to her email list.

TBD            The Baby Canyon Field Trip  had to be cancelled due to the weather. It will be rescheduled and 

                 those who signed up will all be on the list.

April 14:      Ron Parker, author of Chasing Centuries: The Search for Ancient Agave Cultivars Across the Desert Southwest;

                 with books available for purchase.

April 18       Loy Butte Area Pictographs Hike led by Wayne Swart; near Honanki, outsider Sedona. Meet at the Sedona Library

                 at 8 am. Moderate hike of about 4 miles round trip on mostly level ground, half of which is off trail. There is a less than

                 100 ft. ascent to the pictographs at the destination. Limited to 15 people. For more information email Eric Feldman at

                 feldbrain@gmail.com.

May 12:      Don Liponi, photographer and editor of La Rumorosa: Rock Art Along the Border, Volume 2, with books available

                 for purchase.

Upcoming Events at Pueblo Grande:

March 14:   9 am-3 pm. 20th Annual Ancient Technology Day on at PGM. Try your hand at throwing an atlatl, weaving cloth,

                and sample roasted agave. Artists will demonstrate how people used various technologies. Free arts and crafts

                activities are available for the kids. Enjoy various cultural, historic, and technology demonstrations and artifact

                show-and-tell stations throughout the day.

March 19:  10-10:45 am, Behind the Scenes Tour with Curator. Join collections staff for a “behind the scenes” tour of the

                museums’ collections.

March 21:   8-11 am, Mudslinging on the platform mound. Call 602- 495-0901 to volunteer.

March 27:   10-11 am. Guided Tour of the Park of the Four Waters takes you through the remnants of two very impressive

                 prehistoric canals. Sign up on the day of the tour.

March 21:   8 am-5 pm, PGM, Arizona Project Archaeology Master Teachers will hold Arizona's first all-day Teacher Workshop

                for 3rd to 5th grade history teachers. There is no cost to participants. Our generous sponsors will provide space,

                food and program materials. Go to https://www.asspfoundation.org/arizona-project-archaeology to download and fill

                out the application and submit to by the registration deadline of March 7. The class is limited to 20 participants.

Phoenix Chapter Meetings are held at 7 pm on the 2nd Tuesday of each month in the Community Room at the Pueblo Grande Museum, 4619 E. Washington St., Phoenix. We take the speaker to dinner at 5:30 pm at the Ruby Tuesday Restaurant on 44th Street and Washington just northwest of the museum. If you are interested in having dinner with the speaker, please call or email Marie (480-390-3491 or mbrit@cox.net) so that she can reserve a large enough table.

--Ellie Large

FEBRUARY 2020 CHAPTER NEWS

Feb. 11th Meeting: Gregory McNamee will present The Gila: River of History. Six hundred miles long from its source in the mountains of southwestern New Mexico to its confluence with the Colorado River above Yuma, the Gila has been an important avenue for the movement of birds, animals, plants, and peoples across the desert for millennia. Many cultures have sprung up on its banks, and millions of people depend on the river today - whether they know it or not. Gregory McNamee, author of the prizewinning book Gila: The Life and Death of an American River, presents a biography of this vital resource, drawing on Native American stories, pioneer memoirs, the writings of modern naturalists such as Aldo Leopold and Edward Abbey, and many other sources. Think of it as 70 million years of history packed into an entertaining, informative hour. To download a flyer for the February meeting, go to the Phoenix Chapter page on the AAS website.

Gregory McNamee is a writer, editor, photographer, and publisher. He is the author of 40 books and more than 6,000 articles and other publications. He is a contributing editor to the Encyclopædia Britannica, a research fellow at the Southwest Center of the University of Arizona, and a lecturer in the Eller School of Management at the University of Arizona. This presentation is made possible by the AZ Speaks program, the longest-running and most popular program of Arizona Humanities, a statewide 501(c)3 non-profit organization and the Arizona affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Feb. 11th Silent Auction: Please collect any items you wish to donate for the silent auction and bring them with you. We will set up the room in the afternoon and we should be able to get into it soon after 6:30 pm. We will have our standard AAS donation sheets available for you to fill out. (If you want to fill them out beforehand and bring them with you, email me at elarge@cox.com and I will email them to you.) We will also be selling raffle tickets for an Acoma pot - you can buy tickets for the raffle before and after the evening's presentation. The winning ticket will be drawn at the April 14th meeting.

Jan. 14th Meeting: Janine Hernbrode presented Patterns in Petroglyphs: Hints of the Hohokam Cosmology on the Landscape. After 15 years of recording and analysis of more than 16,000 glyphs located in landscapes with similar characteristics, she and her research partner, Dr. Peter Boyle, have concluded that these images record the belief systems of its creators. The images are interwoven into lines and circles and more complex images carefully placed in very particular locations on the landscape. By applying the scientific method to the patterns observed, by working with ethnographic accounts and linguistic analysis by others, and by consulting with indigenous people, they have gained some understanding of, and identified threads of continuity between, Native American belief systems and rock art motifs. She carefully led us through the reasoning behind their conclusions. It was a really good and thought-provoking presentation.

Reminder: only AAS members can go on field trips! Renew today if you haven't already. You can renew by downloading the Phoenix Chapter membership page from https://azarchsoc.wildapricot.org/Phoenix and mailing the form and your check to the address shown, or you can renew and pay online using AffiniPay or a debit or credit card on the AAS website. Logon to www.AzArchSoc.org,click on Membership under About Us, and follow the instructions.

Upcoming Field Trips:

Feb. 22     Baby Canyon on the Agua Fria National Monument with Mike Hoogendyk. Ruins, petroglyphs. Bad road, easy hike. Needs

               a high-clearance, 4 x 4 truck or jeep. [OR we can ask Mike to take us to an easy access ruin. He has dedicated his life

               to exploring AFNM, and is very knowledgeable about the history and prehistory of the area. If the weather's bad, the

               river is high, or the mud is deep, we'll do an easy access hike to another site in the AFNM or in the Phoenix area. Email

               Phyllis at 76desert@gmail.com and let her know what you want to do.

TBD          Loy Butte Area Pictographs Hike led by Wayne Swart; near Honanki, outsider Sedona. About 2 miles one way, a little bit

               of bush-whacking. If there is any interest we can visit a ruin site about one mile further down the same path.

Upcoming Meetings:

March 10   Allen Dart, Az Humanities, The Antiquity of Irrigation in the Southwest

April 14:    Ron Parker, author of Chasing Centuries: The Search for Ancient Agave Cultivars Across the Desert Southwest;

               with books available for purchase

May 12:    Don Liponi, La Rumorosa: Rock Art Along the Border, Volume 2, with books available for purchase

Upcoming Events:

Feb. 7       12-1 pm, PGM. Free lecture on Hohokam Marine Shell Jewelry Acquisition, Production, and Use at Pueblo Grande

                    by Andrea Gregory, ACS.

Feb. 14      12-1 pm, PGM. Free lecture on Akimel O’odham and Pee Posh Bow and Arrow Technology: Modern Experimental

                   Testing of Ancient Designs by Chris Loendorf, GRIC.

Feb. 15      1:30 pm. AAS/SWAT Study Group at Tempe History Museum. Call Ellen Martin at 480-820-1474  for more information or

                if you would like to be added to her email list.

Feb. 21      12-1 pm, PGM. Free lecture on The Ghost Canals of Phoenix: Using aerial photography and mapping data to

                    identify the persistent patterns of early Phoenix irrigation by Dan Garcia, SRP

Feb. 22      11 am-3 pm. Mata Ortiz pottery and Zapotec weaving show and sale. Dr. John Bezy will be available for questions

                about the Mata Ortiz ceramic tradition and the archaeological area of Paquimé (Casas Grandes, Chihuahua). Master

                artist Oralia López will answer your questions about the intricate process of painting these pots. Internationally

                renowned Zapotec weavers from Teotitlan del Valle, Oaxaca, Mexico will answer questions on the textiles.

March 9:    2020 Sonoran Symposium at the Sonoran Desert Inn and Conference Center in Ajo. Go to

                https://www.sonoransymposium.com for more information.

Upcoming Fundraiser: We will have a Book Sale at our March meeting. Please collect any books, posters, maps, etc., that you want to donate and bring them to the meeting on March 10th. We have already received a generous donation of about 40 archaeology books and pamphlets from Don Schuldes in memory of his wife, Marilyn Schuldes, who was a long-time member of the Phoenix Chapter. We will donate the proceeds to PGM.

The Phoenix Chapter meets at 7 pm on the 2nd Tuesday of each month in the Community Room at the Pueblo Grande Museum, 4619 E. Washington St., Phoenix. We take the speaker to dinner at 5:30 pm at the Ruby Tuesday Restaurant on 44th Street and Washington just northwest of the museum. If you are interested in having dinner with the speaker, please call or email Marie (480-390-3491 or mbrit@cox.net) so that she can reserve a large enough table.

--Ellie Large


January 2020 Chapter News


Jan. 14th Meeting: Janine Hernbrode will talk about Patterns in Petroglyphs: Hints of the Hohokam Cosmology on the Landscape. Fifteen years of rock art recording on four major petroglyph sites in Southern Arizona has enabled the assembly of motif details, drawings and photographs of more than 16,000 glyphs located in landscapes with similar characteristics. This vast collection of images records the belief systems of its creators. There were no scenes of everyday life, of grinding corn, or plans for constructing pit houses. The images recording their belief system are interwoven into lines and circles and more complex images carefully placed on the landscape. By applying the scientific method to the patterns observed, by working with ethnographic accounts and linguistic analysis by others, and by consulting with indigenous people, we have gained some understanding of, and identified threads of continuity between, Native American belief systems and rock art motifs. To download a flyer for the January meeting, go to the Phoenix Chapter page on the AAS website.

Janine Hernbrode is an independent rock art recorder and researcher based in Tucson and is on the board of Archaeology Southwest. Wary of becoming relentless quantifiers through rock art recording, she and her research partner, Dr. Peter Boyle, worked together to collect and analyze data obtained from their recordings of Tumamoc Hill, the Sutherland Wash Rock Art District, and the Cocoraque Butte and Cocoraque Ranch. Hernbrode and Boyle demonstrate that ethnographic and linguistic information can suggest links to both sacred landscapes and some motifs found in rock art. Janine and Peter received the 2019 Crabtree Award from the Society for American Archaeology, which is presented annually to an outstanding avocational archaeologist in remembrance of the singular contributions of Don Crabtree. Janine is also the Leader of the Rock Band, a group of volunteer rock art recorders whose work was honored by the State Historic Preservation Office. She and the Rock Band currently are working to inventory and record the rock art in the Tucson Mountain District of Saguaro National Park, as part of an effort to understand the variety of sites in a portion of the Avra Valley.

Dec. 10th Meeting: At the December meeting we held the election for 2020's board officers. They are:

President:  Ellie Large                   1-Year Dir/Newsletter:     Nancy Unferth

Exec VP:   Eric Feldman               2-Year Dir/Field Trips:      Phyllis Smith

Treasurer:  Gail Williams              3-Year Dir/Membership:   Vicki Caltabiano

Secretary:  Ellen Martin                Archivist/Cert Rep            Marie Britton

The presentation was on Angkor Wat and the Khmer Empire of Cambodia by Todd W. Bostwick, Ph.D. Todd gave a very interesting presentation on his recent trip to Cambodia to view the remains of a remarkable group of ancient stone temples built in the tropical forests of Cambodia and Thailand between the 8th and 13th centuries AD. The temples are not only impressive in size but are elaborately decorated with beautifully carved sculptures of Hindu gods, sacred dancing girls, and Buddha faces on lintels, walls, and free-standing stelae before and within the temples. The urban complex of the World Heritage site of Angkor Wat in modern day Siem Reap, Cambodia, is at least 200 square kilometers in area. He included some of the latest research at this World Heritage site as well as giving us some interesting sidelights on the trip itself.

Upcoming Field Trips:

Jan 18   Cocoraque Ranch Petroglyph Site tour with Janine Hernbrode. $20 fee. Sign up at the Jan. 14 meeting or email Eric

            at feldbrain@hotmail.com

TBD       Feb. or March, depending on the weather. Phyllis contacted Mike Hoogendyk and we have a tentative field trip to

               Baby Canyon or another site in Agua Fria National Monument. Bad road, easy hike.

TBD       Loy Butte Area Pictographs Hike led by Wayne Swart. About 2 miles one way, a little bit of bush-whacking. If there

            is any interest we can visit a ruin site about one mile further down the same path.

Upcoming Conference:

Jan. 30-Feb. 1: The 2020 Southwest Symposium will be held on the ASU Tempe campus in the Ventana Ballroom of the Memorial

                      Union. The theme is Thinking Big: New Approaches to Synthesis and Partnership in the Southwest-

                           Northwest. Go to https://www.southwestsymposium.org for more information.

March 9-12:     2020 Sonoran Symposium at the Sonoran Desert Inn and Conference Center in Ajo. Go to

                      https://www.sonoransymposium.com for more information.

The Phoenix Chapter meets at 7 pm on the 2nd Tuesday of each month in the Community Room at the Pueblo Grande Museum, 4619 E. Washington St., Phoenix. We take the speaker to dinner at 5:30 pm at the Ruby Tuesday Restaurant on 44th Street and Washington just northwest of the museum. If you are interested in having dinner with the speaker, please call or email Marie (480-390-3491 or mbrit@cox.net) so that she can reserve a large enough table.

--Ellie Large

December 2019 Chapter News

Dec. 10th Meeting: The December meeting is our Holiday Potluck, which will begin at 6 pm, followed by a short business meeting and annual election about 7 pm. If joining us for the potluck, please bring  a side dish or dessert to share; meats, rolls and beverages are provided by the chapter. Everyone who attends the potluck will receive a raffle ticket, and after the presentation we will draw tickets for the table decorations.

At the December meeting we will hold the election for next year's board officers. The slate is:

President:   Ellie Large                 1-Year Dir/Newsletter:     Nancy Unferth

Exec VP:     Eric Feldman              2-Year Dir/Field Trips:      Phyllis Smith

Treasurer:   Gail Williams               3-Year Dir/Membership:    Vicki Caltabiano

Secretary:   Ellen Martin                Archivist/Cert Rep           Marie Britton

Temple at Angkor Wat and Detail View of Carved Wall

The presentation, which will begin about 7:30 pm, is on Angkor Wat and the Khmer Empire of Cambodia by Todd W. Bostwick, Ph.D. Angkor Wat  is one of a remarkable group of ancient stone temples that were built in the tropical forests of Cambodia and Thailand between the 8th and 13th centuries AD. The urban complex in modern day Siem Reap, Cambodia is at least 200 square kilometers in area. Their temples are not only impressive in size but are elaborately decorated with beautifully carved sculptures of Hindu gods, sacred dancing girls, and Buddha faces on lintels, walls, and free-standing stelae before and within the temples. This talk will focus on a number of those temples, including Angkor Wat, and will include some of the latest research at this World Heritage site.

Dr. Bostwick has been conducting archaeological research in the Southwest for 40 years.  He was the Phoenix City Archaeologist for 21 years at the Pueblo Grande Museum and is now the Director of Archaeology at the Verde Valley Archaeology Center in Camp Verde. He has an M.A. in Anthropology and a Ph.D. in History from Arizona State University, and taught classes at both ASU and Northern Arizona University for seven years. He has published numerous books and articles on Southwest archaeology and history, and his projects have received awards from the National Park Service, the Arizona Governor’s Archaeology Advisory Commission, and the Arizona Archaeological Society.

Nov. 12th Meeting: John Langan, Archaeological Project Director for Aztec Eng., Phoenix, explained what was learned from the excavation of 25 sites in advance of highway widening along State Route 86, which stretches from Why, Az., to Interstate 19 just south of Tucson. Prior archaeological interpretations were based on work at only four sites in the eastern Papaguería (Ventana Cave, Jackrabbit Ruin, Valshni Village, and Gu Achi) which were thought to be rare sedentary or semi-sedentary outposts in a sparsely populated region. Other than Ventana Cave, which was almost continuously occupied from the Archaic through the historic periods, no evidence for occupation between ca. AD 150 and 750 had been found. The SR86 projects provided evidence for more settled populations continuously occupying the Baboquivari Valley and the foothills of the Quinlan Mountains from the Late Archaic-Early Agricultural period through at least the protohistoric period. Formalized pithouses, maize agriculture, and a complex and distinctive mortuary pattern indicate a greater degree of permanence than previously recognized. These populations may have practiced a somewhat mobile subsistence strategy, similar to the “two-village” approach common to historic Tohono O’odham groups. Nearly all sites from which reliable dates were obtained included more than one temporal component, suggesting repeated occupations.

Jan. 14th Meeting: Janine Hernbrode, Archaeology Southwest, will talk about Patterns in Petroglyphs: Hints of the Hohokam Cosmology on the Landscape

Jan 18th Field Trip: Cocoraque Ranch Petroglyph Site tour with Janine Hernbrode. $20 fee. More information later. (See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cocoraque_Butte_Archaeological_District for more info on the site.)

Upcoming Conference:

Jan. 30-Feb. 1: The 2020 Southwest Symposium Biennial Archaeological Conference will be held on the ASU Tempe campus in the Ventana Ballroom of the Memorial Union. The theme is Thinking Big: New Approaches to Synthesis and Partnership in the Southwest-Northwest. Go to https://www.southwestsymposium.org for more info.

The Phoenix Chapter meets at 7 pm on the 2nd Tuesday of each month in the Community Room at the Pueblo Grande Museum, 4619 E. Washington St., Phoenix. We take the speaker to dinner at 5:30 pm at the Ruby Tuesday Restaurant on 44th Street and Washington just northwest of the museum. If you are interested in having dinner with the speaker, please call or email Marie (480-390-3491 or mbrit@cox.net) so that she can reserve a large enough table.

--Ellie Large

November 2019 Chapter News


Nov. 12th Meeting: John Langan, Archaeological Project Director for Aztec Eng., Phoenix, will explain what was learned from Recent Excavations in the Eastern Papaguería. Excavation of 25 sites in advance of highway widening along State Route 86 since 2010 has yielded some of the only data pertaining to small sites in the area between the Tucson Basin and the western Papaguería. (SR86 stretches from Why, Az., to Interstate 19 just south of Tucson). Prior archaeological interpretations were based on work at only four sites in the eastern Papaguería (Ventana Cave, Jackrabbit Ruin, Valshni Village, and Gu Achi) which were thought to be rare sedentary or semi-sedentary outposts in a sparsely populated region. Other than Ventana Cave, which was almost continuously occupied from the Archaic through the historic periods, no evidence for occupation between ca. AD 150 and 750 had been found. The SR86 projects provide evidence for more settled populations continuously occupying the Baboquivari Valley and the foothills of the Quinlan Mountains from the Late Archaic-Early Agricultural period through at least the protohistoric period. Formalized pithouses, maize agriculture, and a complex and distinctive mortuary pattern indicate a greater degree of permanence than previously recognized. These populations may have practiced a somewhat mobile subsistence strategy, similar to the “two-village” approach common to historic Tohono O’odham groups. Nearly all sites from which reliable dates were obtained included more than one temporal component, suggesting repeated occupations.

John Langan has a B.A. in Anthropology from the University of Arizona and has worked in Cultural Resources Management since 2001, when he began working for the National Park Service. He joined AZTEC’s cultural resources program in 2007 and has since participated in hundreds of archaeological and environmental projects in support of transportation and infrastructure development. He has become particularly interested in the archaeology of the Papaguería from working on the SR 86 projects. He is keenly interested in mobilizing the information gathered by CRM projects to further public and academic understanding of prehistory and history

Oct. 8th Meeting: The speakers for our October meeting were Drs. Suzanne and Paul Fish, ASM, Tucson, who talked about Two Early Villages on Tumamoc Hill. Before excavations began on Tumamoc Hill in 1985, this trincheras site located just west of downtown Tucson was thought to be a late Classic Period Hohokam site that contained only sleeping circles. Excavations revealed that it had been occupied much earlier and contained the remains of two sequential villages. The preceramic Cienega phase village dates between 500 and 200 BC, toward the end of the Early Agricultural period, and the residents had constructed some, if not all, of the 1.9 km of massive summit walls and terraces on the hill. A central community room was reused in the later Tortolita phase village which had plain and red-slipped ceramics dating to about AD 500. Well-preserved foundations of just over 150 Tortolita phase houses revealed occupational groupings that foreshadow later Hohokam courtyards.

Upcoming Meetings:

Dec. 10:  Todd Bostwick, VVAC, Ankgor and the Khmer Empire of Cambodia

Jan. 14:   Janine Hernbrode, ASW, Patterns in Petroglyphs: Hints of the Hohokam Cosmology on the Landscape

Upcoming Field Trips:

(TBD):       Field trip to a site on the Barry M. Goldwater Range East. Details later.

Jan 18:      Cocoraque Ranch tour with Janine Hernbrode. $25 fee. More information later.

Upcoming Conferences:

Nov. 8:      All day. The 2019 Arizona Archaeological Council Conference will be held at PGM. This year's theme is Current Research in Arizona Archaeology. For more information, go to http://www.arizonaarchaeologicalcouncil.org/.

Jan. 30-Feb. 1:  The 2020 Southwest Symposium Biennial Archaeological Conference will be held on the ASU Tempe campus. The theme is Thinking Big: New Approaches to Synthesis and Partnership in the Southwest-Northwest. Go to https://www.southwestsymposium.org for more info.

The Phoenix Chapter meets at 7 pm on the 2nd Tuesday of each month in the Community Room at the Pueblo Grande Museum, 4619 E. Washington St., Phoenix. We take the speaker to dinner at 5:30 pm at the Ruby Tuesday Restaurant on 44th Street and Washington just northwest of the museum. If you are interested in having dinner with the speaker, please call or email Marie (480-390-3491 or mbrit@cox.net) so that she can reserve a large enough table.

--Ellie Large

October 2019 Chapter News